Geography 970

March 22, 2010

The Augusta National Logo: Abstracting the Abstract

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tim Wallace @ 1:00 pm

So, if anyone has been watching basketball the last couple of days (and I’m guessing some millions of folks have), they’ve most likely been subjected to the barrage of light beer, fast food, fast beer and light food commercials.  One of the commercials in the regular rotation was for the up and coming Masters golf tournament at Augusta National.  A tradition unlike any other . . . etc. etc. Ugh.  I’m not much of a golf spectator, but I did enjoy one aspect of these commercials – the Augusta National Logo.

Augusta National Logo on a Flag and a Teddy Bear

Okay, okay.  I know that there isn’t much special about this logo.  We see logos with maps incorporated in them all of the time.  One of my all time favorites of this is the Massachusetts Lottery hyper-elongated logo.

 

But then I saw the Augusta National flower bed.

The August logo on a flag or a teddy bear looks like a map of the US, right?  But this flower bed looks more like the original logo and less like a map of the US.  If someone painted the flower bed, it’s fair to guess that it would look even less like a map of the US.  So, who cares?  Hopefully not cartographers.  I know I don’t care.  The point of the logo is to be logo-like – to be memorable.  The fact that it uses an outline of the US is only one component of this.  The outline of the US is a reference to the reach of the organization for which the logo was designed.  The precision of the bounds doesn’t matter, does it?  Here are some other nice ones:

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1 Comment »

  1. It’s interesting to think about how state and country outlines can become iconic. And how easily subverted they are…if you suddenly change the outline of Minnesota so that north isn’t up, no one would recognize it.

    Comment by Daniel Huffman — March 22, 2010 @ 1:04 pm


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