Geography 970

February 14, 2010

Will People Plant Latent Content?

Filed under: Uncategorized — Tim Wallace @ 11:57 am

I don’t mean to beat the dead horse here.  I’m not the first (or even second) person to bring up Bing and their new endeavors in mashup land with Sea Dragon technology and all.  But I did think it was worth bringing a couple of links to the forefront.

1.  A short video showing how Microsoft mined creative commons Flickr images to make high res street view maps.

2.  Vancouver, BC in high res street view.

I realize it’s difficult when reading about these applications to find analysis that goes beyond “wow”, but they really are on to something here.  Google’s streetview (little, creepy spy cars) are nice, but not exactly efficient or  sustainable.  Mining latent open source content on the other hand, well . . . that just is sustainable.  And what’s more – if users get frustrated that the images are out of date, they have no one to blame but themselves.  Right?  You want a more up to date picture of Carhenge – go take the picture yourself and load it up.

It makes me wonder though.  How many of these photos go through any kind of QA/QC process?  Are they filtered for digitally-imposed advertisements?  I could definitely see a company taking loads of photos around a town, perhaps mostly of areas with billboards.  Then, they could change the contents of the billboard to “myawesomecompany.com” and upload them to Flickr.  Who knows how far along these images would get, but you have to wonder if anything like that has gotten through already.

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1 Comment »

  1. I never thought of the intentional spamming angle before – but I’m sure lots of other folks have. There are a couple of models out there for dealing with this, from WIkipedia (policed by a group of dedicated volunteers), to YouTUbe (policed by the poster), to a more traditional QA/QC process (i.e., Microsoft do this themselves, via outsourcing to India).

    Comment by markharrower — February 21, 2010 @ 9:39 pm


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